What to expect during your first year as a truck driver?

Starting a new career as a truck driver can be both exciting and challenging, as drivers learn to navigate the ins and outs of the job. Though it’s obvious that truckers will be driving for eight to 10 hours a day, here are a few things new drivers should expect during their first year in the industry.

A New Lifestyle

New truckers will need to learn how to tailor their lifestyle around their new job. Being out on the road for weeks at a time will mean spending less time with family and friends. This may be one of the hardest aspects of the job to get used to, but truckers who mentally prepare themselves for this will find a way to keep in touch with loved ones while they’re away.

Less Favorable Loads

As with any other occupation, junior truckers have to work for a few years before they can choose which loads they want to take. First year drivers may need to drive to desolate locations or very busy cities (like New York City), and make pickups and deliveries late at night or very early in the morning.

This is typical of all trucking companies, as managers are testing a driver’s skills and reliability. First year drivers must show that they’re able to deliver a load on time, know how to clearly communicate with dispatchers, and can properly maintain their truck. 

The Wonders and Sights of America

Of course, the highlights of delivering loads all across the country include seeing how different and unique the American landscape truly is — from the countryside, to big cities, and suburbs. While their trailer is being unloaded or reloaded, truckers can take a rideshare to visit landmarks, explore beautiful nature spots, and even dine at the best restaurants. 

The Financial Perks

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, truck drivers can expect to earn a median income of $37,770. The industry is growing, and there is high demand for new drivers. The current driver shortage is driving wages up and is creating a healthy competition among trucking companies for well-trained truckers.

Source: http://www.americatruckdriving.com