Driving in the fog

Driving in the fog is dangerous, whether you’re driving a sedan or an 18-wheeler. If you’re driving an 18-wheeler, here’s what you can do to protect yourself and reduce the risk of an accident in foggy weather. 

1Slow down — even if you’re familiar with the road.

Just because you’ve driven down that road before, doesn’t mean you know every twist and turn. There may be an accident or a slowdown up ahead that you won’t be able to anticipate. Reduce your speed and be prepared to hit the brakes.

Turn on your lights even if you’re driving during the day. Be on the lookout for drivers who may have forgotten to turn on their lights. 

3Use your four-way flashers.

Turning on your four-way flashers, or emergency warning lights, can help increase your truck’s visibility to other drivers and prevent an accident.

4Be on the lookout for vehicles stopped on the side of the road.

The driver in front of you may become disoriented and drive off the road. Make sure you’re following the road to avoid driving off into a ditch and flipping over.

5Avoid changing lanes or passing other vehicles.

For as long as driving conditions remain foggy, you won’t be driving anywhere near the speed limit. Focus on safety — not schedule. An accident caused by poor driving will lead to greater delay (not to mention injuries) than driving slowly in foggy weather.

6Don’t drive faster than what you can see, react to, or stop. 

The denser the fog, the slower your driving speed. Drive as slow as you need to to stay safe — not just for the sake of your safety but for the safety of other drivers and passengers.

7Don’t drive in heavy fog — your safety should be your priority. 

At some point, driving in the fog is just not worth the risk. Every truck driving company should prioritize the safety of their drivers over profit. So pull over, and wait.

Source: http://www.americatruckdriving.com